Tuesday, October 23, 2007

"Border to Border" exhibit not to be missed


The highlight of my Monday was my appointment with Clarke College professor and friend Abdul Sinno and his son Rafic to see their photography exhibit on campus.

"Border to Border: A Journey of the Mississippi," featuring more than five dozen photographs captured along the fantastic length of America's River, is an exhibit not to be missed.

Seeing the photos was one thing; to receive personal commentary from the photographers themselves added to the experience.

Over the last few years, Abdul and Rafic have traveled the length of the Mississippi, from its origin at Lake Itasca, Minn., to the Gulf of Mexico near Pilottown, La. Last year they published a book of images, "Treasures of the Mississippi: Panoramas & Poetic Reflections," from the Upper Mississippi (between St. Paul and St. Louis).

In this exhibit, 10 states touching the Mississippi are represented, but their show includes plenty of scenes from this area -- some from common angles and other from perspectives that are less familiar.

As someone who was born in a Mississippi River city and who has lived in three other communities on its shore (Quincy, Ill.; Winona, Minn.; and now Dubuque), I am partial to these river scenes. However, I don't think I'm being unreasonably partisan when I say that I was most impressed with the images.

The exhibit is scheduled to end Oct. 31, but it's possible it might close a couple of days early due to construction schedules on campus. Don't take a chance: Take time now to stop in the Atrium Conference Room at Clarke and enjoy this exhibit.

(The video clips cuts off early -- sorry, Rafic! -- but you get the idea.)

video

1 comment:

erik hogstrom said...

Abdul just gave me a personal tour of the exhibit.
It is quite amazing.
Here's the sad part, though: They are taking down the exhibit TONIGHT.
He is in negotiation for additional showings in places such as Chicago and New York. I think everyone should see it.
It really a celebration of the river and America (and the images look startling on canvas).